How to make coffee from beans

Starting with quality beans and then using freshly roasted and grind coffee is vital. Roasting coffee at home is very easy and exciting process; what you need is just a flat-bottomed frying pan, a spatula, and a stove. Once you get your coffee roasted, you must use a grinder that is going to give you an even texture, which is the burr grinder. The next important component to brew best coffee is the quality of water. Using filtered water would be the best choice since the chemicals that can alter the test of your coffee is removed from filtered water. http://www.techinsider.io/best-way-brew-coffee-home-2016-1

After obtaining the quality coffee beans and deciding on roasting and grinding, it is time now to decide on the brewing method. There are so many brewing methods and it is very difficult to decide what brewing method makes the best coffee. The three coffee brewing methods that I like are using the Ethiopian clay pot called Jebena, a quality drip brewer, and a stove top espresso maker or a Moka pot. Both Jebena and Moka pot take longer than the drip brewer. Though Jebena coffee takes longer than the Moka pot, it is the best coffee brewing I recommend you to try.

A Moka pot
A Moka pot

If you enjoy a strong cup of coffee that has a similar test as espresso, the Moka pot is a great choice for you. The stove top espresso maker or Moka pot is an aluminum pot with three parts tightly screwed together. A lower chamber for the water, an upper reservoir for the brewed coffee with a flip up top and a side pour spout, and a funnel-shaped filter in the middle for the ground coffee. The coffee is placed in the funnel-shaped filtered platform that is placed in the water in the lower chamber and the upper filtered reservoir is screwed on top. The pot is placed on the stove under medium heat. The boiling water created steam and pressure to force the water through the coffee grounds upward to the upper chamber. When all the water is gone up to the top chamber, the pot makes a gurgling sound that indicates the brewing is completed and the coffee is ready to be enjoyed. Since the contact of the beans with the boiling water is short, the grind for Moka pot has to be medium fine to ensure that as much flavor as possible is extracted during the contact.

Stove for Jebena

stove for Jebena
stove for Jebena

Since Jebena has a rounded bottom, it is important to use the right kind of stove to get it stand. Gas stoves with top burner grates are the best choice; however, extra caution is required while using an eclectic coil or smooth top stoves.  This is the one that I use at home and it is the best one that I found. It actually is designed for Jebena. However, there are several other kinds of small table top electric coil stoves that will work also.

Jebena

Jebena: Ethiopian clay coffee pot

The best coffee brewing pot
Jebena

Jebena is a clay pot used to brew coffee in Ethiopia, which makes one of the best coffee in the world. There are two types of Jebena; the most common type is with a spherical base, long neck, and spout while the other one is without a spout, which is only common in the Northern Ethiopia and Eritrea. People in the rest of the region prefer to use the common type with the spout.

No spout Jebena
No spout Jebena

Most Jebena’s that are purchased from the marketplace in Ethiopia have to go through heat curing and seasoning stages before first use. The heat curing process is where the jebena is baked in an open fire to dry any moisture and strengthen the pot. Once the heat curing is done, the pot is going to seasoning in order to eliminate any remaining clay odor. About 8 to 10 oz of milk and 8 to 10 tablespoon of coffee, depending on the size of the Jebena, is added to the pot and allowed to boil for a couple of minutes. Then, the mixture is discarded and the Jebena is rinsed thoroughly with warm water until the water that is coming out of the pot is clean. However, Jebena that is ready for use can be purchased from …..

Due to the porous nature of the pot, using any kind of soap is going to ruin the taste of the coffee. Only hand wash using warm water is recommended. In addition, gas stoves with top burner grates are the best choice since the Jebena has a spherical bottom; however, extra caution is required while using an eclectic coil or smooth top stoves.

Ethiopian coffee ceremony

Ethiopian coffee ceremony
Ethiopian coffee ceremony

The importance of coffee ceremony is to socialize with family, friends, and neighbors. For a visitor, having the coffee ceremony is the most important hospitality.

roasting coffee
roasting coffee

 

cooling-grinding-brewing-incense buring
cooling-grinding-brewing-incense burning

First, the coffee is washed with warm water until all the husks are removed. Then, the coffee is roasted by stirring them in a flat pan or shaking them in a shallow pan on a charcoal fire unit the beans turn to shiny brown and the aromatic oil is coaxed out of them. The hot roasted coffee is poured into a flat basket and passed around for the people to appreciate the rich aroma. Then, the coffee is ground by hand with a wooden mortar and pestle once it is cooled. The ground coffee is then brewed in a special long naked clay pot called Jebena.

 

Pouring Coffee
Pouring Coffee

Burning an incense (a type of gum which is called “Etan”) in a small charcoal stove (a small brazier) next to the coffee, arranging grasses on the floor, and eating snacks are part of the ceremony.  So, a basket of snacks like bread, roasted barley or popcorn are passed around the room. Then, the coffee is poured into small cups and pass around.